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Emotional influences on the voice and manner of speech
Emotionale Einflüsse auf die Stimme und Sprechweise
Project status: Running
Faculty: Psychotherapy Science
Project leader: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Giselher Guttmann
Project runtime: 01.01.2011 - 31.12.2021
Research Focus:
  • Fundamental Psychotherapy Science Research
Topic:
  • Theory
Project leader:

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Giselher Guttmann (giselher.guttmann@sfu.ac.at

Project team:

Christine Begle; Mirjam Dannecker; Anatol Möller; Julia Stollenwerk 

Cooperation partners:

Univ.-Doz.Dr. Werner Deutsch, Institut für Schallforschung der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften

Project runtime:

01.01.2011 - 31.12.2021

Grants:

keine

Description:

English
Aspects of the width of the sound (relaxation, pleasure) and its narrowness (“laced throat”) may be made visible in the spectrogram.
We start with a clean set of voice samples as well as the recognition and segmentation of phonetically comparable segments, which are then automatically evaluated. A pilot study on the objectification of the therapy success during an assertiveness training for “shy girls” has demonstrated encouraging results.
German
Auswirkungen von emotionalen Veränderungen auf die Stimme (voice settings) und Sprechweise werden sonagraphisch objektiviert. Aspekte der faukalen Weite (Entspannung, Freude) und faukalen Enge („zugeschnürte Kehle“) können im Spektrogramm sichtbar gemacht werden.

Aspekte der faukalen Weite (Entspannung, Freude) und faukalen Enge („zugeschnürte Kehle“) können im Spektrogramm sichtbar gemacht werden.
Wir beginnen mit einer sauberen Sammlung von Sprachproben, sowie im Erkennen und in der Segmentierung phonetisch vergleichbarer Segmente, die sodann automatisch ausgewertet werden können.Eine Pilotstudie über die Objektivierung des Therapieerfolges bei einem Assertiveness-Training für „schüchterne Mädchen“ hat ermutigende Ergebnisse geliefert.
Transcultural Mindfulness (TM)
Project status: Running
Faculty: Psychotherapy Science
Project leader: Dr. Gerald Virtbauer
Project runtime: 01.02.2016 - 01.02.2022
Research Focus:
  • Fundamental Psychotherapy Science Research
Topic:
  • Culture and Interculturalism
Project leader:

Dr. Gerald Virtbauer (gerald.virtbauer@sfu.ac.at

Project team:

 

Cooperation partners:

Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, www.ocbs.org; Oxford Mindfulness Centre, www.oxfordmindfulness.org

Project runtime:

01.02.2016 - 01.02.2022

Grants:

keine

Description:

English
TM is Dr Virtbauer’s habilitation project in transcultural psychotherapy at the SFU. A new transcultural approach to mindfulness is developed. Mindfulness meditation is an ancient Buddhist practice that has been integrated into Western psychotherapy, psychology, and medicine. Mindfulness plays an increasingly important role in Western health systems. It is particularly useful in the prevention and treatment of stress-related illnesses and disorders. Many Buddhist scholars consider the Buddhist Pali canon the earliest corpus of Buddhist literature, recorded in the middle Indo-Aryan language of Pali. It includes the texts on mindfulness that have played the key role in the reception and integration of this originally Buddhist practice in Western clinical settings. TM reflects on mindfulness from the perspectives of Pali-Buddhist studies and Western clinical psychology and psychotherapy. TM compares the theoretical and practical approaches to mindfulness in Pali Buddhism with the Western clinical approaches to mindfulness. This comparison is of great importance for the further development of the theory and application of mindfulness meditation in the West. Though mindfulness is widely applied in some European countries in clinical settings there is still a lot of confusion about the meaning and practice of mindfulness in its Buddhist root texts. TM fills a critical gap in the current academic discourses on clinical mindfulness, where the need for a more precise understanding of mindfulness’s Buddhist roots has come to the fore. In this way TM also shows new possibilities of applying and integrating mindfulness in Western society. Theoretical and practical research methods are combined. The theoretical work focuses on descriptive and comparative dimensions. Buddhist mindfulness (Pali „sati“) is analysed, interpreted, and described in a way that is understandable to Western clinicians. Sati is compared in-depth with the current Western clinical concepts of mindfulness. The fieldwork in the UK, Sri Lanka, and India employs interviews with mindfulness experts (both Buddhist and clinical) and participatory observation in the field (in Buddhist monasteries and meditation centres where mindfulness is practised). The research is methodologically based on contemporary approaches to the descriptive phenomenological psychology and the phenomenology of religion. The project’s outcomes will be of great use to the increasing number of Western people that want to include mindfulness into their lives. The development of TM will be a mayor contribution to the clinical mindfulness discourses. It will stimulate further discussion and research. It will play an important role in the training of future mindfulness scholars and scientists. Mindfulness is a young field in Western science that has developed in an increasingly interdisciplinary direction in the last years. TM will be the first comprehensive source for studying mindfulness interdisciplinarily based on its Buddhist roots.

Academic advisors
Ven. Dr Khammai Dhammasami (University of Oxford)
Prof. Richard Gombrich (University of Oxford)
Prof. Giselher Guttmann (SFU)
Dr John Peacocke (University of Oxford)
Prof. Johannes Reichmayr (SFU)
Dr Sarah Shaw (University of Oxford)
Dr Jan Westerhoff (University of Oxford)
Prof. Mark Williams (University of Oxford)
Prof. Stefano Zacchetti (University of Oxford)